Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated Maximum Heart Rate



Heart rate or the rating of perceived effort (RPE) technique may be used to determine exercise intensity. We'll go through each of these techniques one by one. The percentage of maximum heart rate technique and the heart rate reserve (HRR), or karvonen method are two ways for measuring exercise intensity using heart rate.


The percentage of maximal heart rate technique, as its name implies, includes prescription exercise at a specific percentage of maximum heart rate. We need to test a person's actual maximal heart rate in a laboratory to figure out what it is. However, since this is unrealistic for the majority of individuals, we may estimate maximal heart rate using the formula ‘220 – age.'


Method of calculating heart rate as a percentage of total heart rate (Example 1)


‘Mariella,' 30 years old, is a case study.


Determine your maximum heart rate (HRmax)

HRmax = 220 – age = 220 – 30= 190 beats per minute (beats per minute)

Calculate exercise intensity according to ACSM guidelines: 55–90% of HRmax

Lower goal (55 percent) = 190 55 percent = 190 0.55 = 104.5 beats per minute (we would round this up to 105 bpm)

Upper goal (90%) = 190 90% = 190 0.90 = 171 beats per minute

This formula provides us a rough estimate of maximal heart rate, but keep in mind that it is just a rough approximation. Mariella should exercise at a heart rate of 105 to 171 beats per minute utilising this technique, according to ACSM recommendations. Because this is such a broad range, you'll have to determine whether to give Mariella exercise at the higher or lower end of the scale, depending on her fitness levels.


Please keep in mind that you may use internet calculators to compute all of this data for you. A calculator like this may be found at:


http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/...tor target.asp


Because it considers the individual's resting heart rate, the HRR technique is considered to be more accurate than the % of maximum heart rate method. In Box 2, you'll find the formula for computing HRR. According to the American College of Sports Medicine, exercise intensity should be set at 40–85 percent of maximum heart rate (HRr) or 55–90 percent of maximum heart rate (HRmax) to enhance aerobic fitness (Pollock et al., 1998). These ranges are intentionally broad to reflect different levels of fitness; for example, someone with relatively low levels of fitness who has just started an exercise programme may need to work at a lower intensity, whereas someone with a higher level of fitness, perhaps who has been exercising for a while, may need to work at a higher intensity. This exemplifies the significance of progression in a workout routine.


Heart Rate Reserve Method (Example 2)


‘Mariella,' 30 years old, is a case study.


Determine your maximum heart rate (HRmax)

HRmax = 220 – age = 220 – 30 = 190 bpm Estimated HRmax = 220 – age = 220 – 30 = 190 bpm (beats per minute)

Calculate your resting heart rate (HRrest)

You may use a heart rate monitor or manually measure it with your fingertips. It is best to measure it first thing in the morning. Assume Mariella's resting heart rate is 70 beats per minute.

Calculate your reserve heart rate (HRR)

HRR = HRmax – HRrest = 190 – 70 = 120 bpm HRR = HRmax – HRrest = 190 – 70 = 120 bpm

Calculate the exercise intensity according to the ACSM recommendations (40–85%). HRR

Lower goal (40%) = (HHR 40%) + HRrest = (120 0.40) + 70 = 48 + 70 = 118 bpm

Upper goal (85%) = (HHR 85%) + HRrest = (120 0.85) + 70 = 102 + 70 = 172 bpm

Mariella should exercise between 118 and 172 bpm using this technique, according to ACSM recommendations.